TR Cutler Manufacturing Journalist Writing About Leveraging Industrial IoT in 2017

Manufacturing journalist, Thomas R. Cutler, sees benefits of closed loop business operations leveraging Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Cutler noted the strengths of the industrial software portfolio to deliver closed loop solutions, through the four value elements of connect-collect-analyze-act across the customer’s value chain; differentiation of Industrial IoT position and strength through industry specificity, global installed base, and industry strength platforms used to scale customer’s operations; and leveraging of cloud and big data based technologies to deliver customer value through Industrial IoT.

Cutler sees innovation and customer value with Industrial IoT enabled portfolio for real-time connectivity, workflows, business logic, and industry solutions complemented by strategic partnerships across the customers’ value chain.  Cutler anticipates a wide variety of feature articles about IIoT throughout 2017.

About TR Cutler, Inc. 

TR Cutler, Inc. was founded seventeen years ago by Thomas R. Cutler. Cutler is the President and CEO of Fort Lauderdale, Florida-based, TR Cutler, Inc., (www.trcutlerinc.com), the largest manufacturing communication firm worldwide with four dozen industry experts and thought leaders on staff. Cutler maintains extraordinary relationships with clients, journalists, editors, economists, trendsetters, and key business leaders worldwide and has become a key resource for those writing about the manufacturing sector.  Cutler founded the Manufacturing Media Consortium in 1999, which now has more than 6,000 global members including journalists, editors, publishers, and economists, worldwide writing about trends, industrial data, manufacturing case studies, material handling profiles, and robotics feature articles. Cutler works with thousands of media outlets to expand the coverage and importance of the manufacturing media coverage.

Cutler has authored more than 6,000 articles for a wide range of manufacturing periodicals, industrial publications, and business journals each published in leading monthly trade magazines, B2B periodicals, blogs, and marquis publications globally. Cutler is the most published freelance industrial journalist worldwide, and more than 3500 industry leaders follow Cutler on Twitter daily at @ThomasRCutler.

Media Contact
Company Name: TR Cutler Inc.
Contact Person: Thomas R. Cutler
Email: Send Email
Phone: 954-682-6200
Address:3032 S. Oakland Forest Dr. S-2803
City: Fort Lauderdale
State: FLORIDA
Country: United States
Website: http://www.trcutlerinc.com

AVIS MÉDIAS : Bill Downe, chef de la direction de BMO prendra la parole lors de la conférence des chefs de la direction de Banques canadiennes de RBC Marchés des capitaux

AVIS MÉDIAS : Bill Downe, chef de la direction de BMO prendra la parole lors de la conférence des chefs de la direction de Banques canadiennes de RBC Marchés des capitaux

BMO Groupe financier

TSX : BMO
NYSE : BMO

BMO Groupe financier

03 janv. 2017 11h06 HE

TORONTO, ONTARIO–(Marketwired – 3 jan. 2017) – Bill Downe, chef de la direction de BMO Groupe financier (TSX:BMO)(NYSE:BMO) participera à la conférence des chefs de la direction de banques canadiennes de RBC Marchés des capitaux qui aura lieu à Toronto, le 10 janvier 2016 à 9h15 (HNE).

L’allocution de M. Downe et la séance de questions et réponses à laquelle il participera seront diffusés en direct, par webdiffusion, à l’adresse www.bmo.com/relationsinvestisseurs. Le document sera ensuite archivé pour une durée de 30 jours.

À propos de BMO Groupe financier

Fondé en 1817, et soulignant actuellement sa 200e année d’exploitation, BMO Groupe financier est un fournisseur de services financiers hautement diversifiés ayant son siège social en Amérique du Nord. Fort d’un actif totalisant 688 milliards de dollars au 31 octobre 2016 et d’un effectif de plus de 45 000 employés, BMO offre à plus de douze millions de clients une vaste gamme de produits et de services dans les domaines des services bancaires aux particuliers et aux entreprises, de la gestion de patrimoine et des services de banque d’affaires. Les activités de BMO Groupe financier sont réparties entre trois groupes d’exploitation : les Services bancaires Particuliers et entreprises, la Gestion de patrimoine et BMO Marchés des capitaux.

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RealPage® Reports Robust Apartment Demand and Occupancy, While the Rent Growth Pace Cools Mildly

RICHARDSON, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Near-record demand for rental apartments registered in 2016, according to rental housing technology and analytics firm RealPage, Inc. (NASDAQ: RP). In turn, occupancy remained tight, despite rising numbers of completions. The rent growth pace is slowing a little, but pricing power remains above the historical norm.

“The apartment sector’s winning streak has run seven full years so far,” RealPage chief economist Greg Willett said. “Job production continues at solid levels, encouraging new household formation. While apartment construction is substantial, significant building is justified by the very strong demand tallies.”

Demand for 328,559 apartments was recorded in 2016 across the country’s 100 largest metros, up 24 percent from 2015’s net move-in total. The 2016 demand figure was the third largest calendar year volume posted during the past three decades, just behind the demand realized in 2000 and again in 2010.

A slew of new properties moving through initial lease-up fueled unusually strong demand for 50,455 units in the fourth quarter, a period when renters tend to be hesitant to move due to the holidays and sometimes challenging weather conditions. Demand in the fourth quarter of 2016 reached more than six times the volume recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015.

Demand in 2016 topped completions that totaled 289,704 apartments. As usual, however, demand in the fourth quarter didn’t keep pace with deliveries. Properties finished during the final three months of the year totaled 87,939 units. The late 2016 additions marked the biggest block of quarterly new supply seen since the mid-1980s.

Occupancy Remains Tight; Rent Growth Slows Mildly

Year-end 2016 apartment occupancy stood at 96.3 percent, up from 95.9 percent in late 2015. Following the normal seasonal pattern, occupancy cooled a bit on a quarterly basis, dipping from 96.5 percent as of September.

Almost all of today’s vacancies in most locales are found in the very expensive brand new completions moving through initial lease-up. It can be very tough to find available units in the middle-tier to lower-end price ranges.

Rent growth is continuing to cool from an annual pace that topped out over 5 percent in 2015, but the 3.8 percent typical price increase posted in 2016 is still well above the long-term historical norm. Over the course of the seven years of the current apartment market cycle, rents have increased a whopping 26.3 percent.

“Rent growth doesn’t have to reach best-ever readings to be strong,” Willett said. “Somewhat smaller price increases certainly were anticipated as the volume of new construction kicked into higher gear.”

While rents backed up 0.5% on a quarterly basis in late 2016, that move is a typical quarterly pattern.

“It’s unusual for rents to shift much during the seasonally slow leasing period,” according to Willett. “Other than in brand new properties renting for the first time, only a few leases are signed in the cold weather months.”

Monthly rents now average $1,248 nationally.

Quite a few of the country’s individual metro rent growth leaders have economies where recovery trailed the national norm and apartment construction hasn’t yet reached aggressive levels. Sacramento and Riverside-San Bernardino, holding down the first and second positions for rent growth, are key examples.

 

Leaders in Annual Rent Growth for New Residents

Calendar 2016

 

Rank

   

Metro

   

Rent Growth

1 Sacramento, CA 9.3%
2 Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 8.5%
3 Seattle, WA 7.8%
4 Phoenix, AZ 7.1%
5 Las Vegas, NV 6.8%
6 Fort Worth, TX 6.7%
7 Nashville, TN 6.5%
8 Los Angeles, CA 6.4%
9 Atlanta, GA 6.3%
10 Portland, OR 6.2%
11 Dallas, TX 6.0%
12 (tie) Providence, RI 5.8%
12 (tie) Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL 5.8%
14 Salt Lake City, UT 5.4%
15 (tie) Orange County, CA 5.3%
15 (tie) San Diego, CA 5.3%
 

Other markets on the rent growth leaderboard are spots where very robust economic growth is keeping the apartment sector performance strong in the face of big deliveries. Seattle and the North Texas metros of Dallas and Fort Worth illustrate that storyline. That rent growth of 6 percent to 7 percent in Dallas-Fort Worth is particularly striking, considering the area accounted for an outsized share of about 7 percent of the nation’s total apartment deliveries in 2016. There are now 49,955 apartments under construction in Dallas-Fort Worth, representing about 9 percent of building activity nationally. That’s the country’s biggest block of product on the way by a giant margin.

Rent cuts continue in a handful of the nation’s key apartment markets. Prices are down about 1 percent on an annual basis across New York (-1.4 percent), Houston (-1.3 percent), San Jose (-1.2 percent) and San Francisco (-0.8 percent).

“While increasing deliveries are creating a more competitive leasing environment for top-tier product in New York and the Bay Area, rent cuts, rather than just a slowdown in the growth pace, seem like an extreme move in many cases,” Willett said. “Bay Area owners and operators perhaps are beginning to realize that they’ve overreacted, as pricing looks like it’s nearing stabilization after more sizable cuts were common a few months ago.”

Deliveries Should Peak in 2017

Ongoing apartment construction in the nation’s 100 largest apartment markets totals 542,446 units, with 364,730 of those apartments found in properties scheduled for 2017 completion. Thus, new supply in the coming year could top 2016’s total by 26 percent. That big bump in deliveries points to more competitive leasing conditions, especially for top-tier properties in the urban core, where building is heavy by historical standards.

It is important to realize, however, that labor shortages and other factors consistently have held completions in this market cycle about 10 percent to 15 percent below the volumes scheduled initially. If that same pattern holds true moving ahead, 2017’s deliveries could line up almost exactly with the demand total posted over the past year, suggesting that concerns about market softening could be overblown.

RealPage’s base-case forecast calls for occupancy to slip about 70 basis points to a still-healthy level well above 95 percent and for annual rent growth to cool a bit further to about 3.2%.

ABOUT REALPAGE, INC.

RealPage is a leading global provider of software and data analytics to the real estate industry. Clients use our platform to improve operating performance and increase capital returns. Founded in 1998 and headquartered in Richardson, Texas, RealPage currently serves over 12,000 clients worldwide from offices in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information about the company, visit http://www.realpage.com.

RealPage® Reports Robust Apartment Demand and Occupancy, While the Rent Growth Pace Cools Mildly

RICHARDSON, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Near-record demand for rental apartments registered in 2016, according to rental housing technology and analytics firm RealPage, Inc. (NASDAQ: RP). In turn, occupancy remained tight, despite rising numbers of completions. The rent growth pace is slowing a little, but pricing power remains above the historical norm.

“The apartment sector’s winning streak has run seven full years so far,” RealPage chief economist Greg Willett said. “Job production continues at solid levels, encouraging new household formation. While apartment construction is substantial, significant building is justified by the very strong demand tallies.”

Demand for 328,559 apartments was recorded in 2016 across the country’s 100 largest metros, up 24 percent from 2015’s net move-in total. The 2016 demand figure was the third largest calendar year volume posted during the past three decades, just behind the demand realized in 2000 and again in 2010.

A slew of new properties moving through initial lease-up fueled unusually strong demand for 50,455 units in the fourth quarter, a period when renters tend to be hesitant to move due to the holidays and sometimes challenging weather conditions. Demand in the fourth quarter of 2016 reached more than six times the volume recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015.

Demand in 2016 topped completions that totaled 289,704 apartments. As usual, however, demand in the fourth quarter didn’t keep pace with deliveries. Properties finished during the final three months of the year totaled 87,939 units. The late 2016 additions marked the biggest block of quarterly new supply seen since the mid-1980s.

Occupancy Remains Tight; Rent Growth Slows Mildly

Year-end 2016 apartment occupancy stood at 96.3 percent, up from 95.9 percent in late 2015. Following the normal seasonal pattern, occupancy cooled a bit on a quarterly basis, dipping from 96.5 percent as of September.

Almost all of today’s vacancies in most locales are found in the very expensive brand new completions moving through initial lease-up. It can be very tough to find available units in the middle-tier to lower-end price ranges.

Rent growth is continuing to cool from an annual pace that topped out over 5 percent in 2015, but the 3.8 percent typical price increase posted in 2016 is still well above the long-term historical norm. Over the course of the seven years of the current apartment market cycle, rents have increased a whopping 26.3 percent.

“Rent growth doesn’t have to reach best-ever readings to be strong,” Willett said. “Somewhat smaller price increases certainly were anticipated as the volume of new construction kicked into higher gear.”

While rents backed up 0.5% on a quarterly basis in late 2016, that move is a typical quarterly pattern.

“It’s unusual for rents to shift much during the seasonally slow leasing period,” according to Willett. “Other than in brand new properties renting for the first time, only a few leases are signed in the cold weather months.”

Monthly rents now average $1,248 nationally.

Quite a few of the country’s individual metro rent growth leaders have economies where recovery trailed the national norm and apartment construction hasn’t yet reached aggressive levels. Sacramento and Riverside-San Bernardino, holding down the first and second positions for rent growth, are key examples.

 

Leaders in Annual Rent Growth for New Residents

Calendar 2016

 

Rank

   

Metro

   

Rent Growth

1 Sacramento, CA 9.3%
2 Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 8.5%
3 Seattle, WA 7.8%
4 Phoenix, AZ 7.1%
5 Las Vegas, NV 6.8%
6 Fort Worth, TX 6.7%
7 Nashville, TN 6.5%
8 Los Angeles, CA 6.4%
9 Atlanta, GA 6.3%
10 Portland, OR 6.2%
11 Dallas, TX 6.0%
12 (tie) Providence, RI 5.8%
12 (tie) Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL 5.8%
14 Salt Lake City, UT 5.4%
15 (tie) Orange County, CA 5.3%
15 (tie) San Diego, CA 5.3%
 

Other markets on the rent growth leaderboard are spots where very robust economic growth is keeping the apartment sector performance strong in the face of big deliveries. Seattle and the North Texas metros of Dallas and Fort Worth illustrate that storyline. That rent growth of 6 percent to 7 percent in Dallas-Fort Worth is particularly striking, considering the area accounted for an outsized share of about 7 percent of the nation’s total apartment deliveries in 2016. There are now 49,955 apartments under construction in Dallas-Fort Worth, representing about 9 percent of building activity nationally. That’s the country’s biggest block of product on the way by a giant margin.

Rent cuts continue in a handful of the nation’s key apartment markets. Prices are down about 1 percent on an annual basis across New York (-1.4 percent), Houston (-1.3 percent), San Jose (-1.2 percent) and San Francisco (-0.8 percent).

“While increasing deliveries are creating a more competitive leasing environment for top-tier product in New York and the Bay Area, rent cuts, rather than just a slowdown in the growth pace, seem like an extreme move in many cases,” Willett said. “Bay Area owners and operators perhaps are beginning to realize that they’ve overreacted, as pricing looks like it’s nearing stabilization after more sizable cuts were common a few months ago.”

Deliveries Should Peak in 2017

Ongoing apartment construction in the nation’s 100 largest apartment markets totals 542,446 units, with 364,730 of those apartments found in properties scheduled for 2017 completion. Thus, new supply in the coming year could top 2016’s total by 26 percent. That big bump in deliveries points to more competitive leasing conditions, especially for top-tier properties in the urban core, where building is heavy by historical standards.

It is important to realize, however, that labor shortages and other factors consistently have held completions in this market cycle about 10 percent to 15 percent below the volumes scheduled initially. If that same pattern holds true moving ahead, 2017’s deliveries could line up almost exactly with the demand total posted over the past year, suggesting that concerns about market softening could be overblown.

RealPage’s base-case forecast calls for occupancy to slip about 70 basis points to a still-healthy level well above 95 percent and for annual rent growth to cool a bit further to about 3.2%.

ABOUT REALPAGE, INC.

RealPage is a leading global provider of software and data analytics to the real estate industry. Clients use our platform to improve operating performance and increase capital returns. Founded in 1998 and headquartered in Richardson, Texas, RealPage currently serves over 12,000 clients worldwide from offices in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information about the company, visit http://www.realpage.com.

RealPage® Reports Robust Apartment Demand and Occupancy, While the Rent Growth Pace Cools Mildly

RICHARDSON, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Near-record demand for rental apartments registered in 2016, according to rental housing technology and analytics firm RealPage, Inc. (NASDAQ: RP). In turn, occupancy remained tight, despite rising numbers of completions. The rent growth pace is slowing a little, but pricing power remains above the historical norm.

“The apartment sector’s winning streak has run seven full years so far,” RealPage chief economist Greg Willett said. “Job production continues at solid levels, encouraging new household formation. While apartment construction is substantial, significant building is justified by the very strong demand tallies.”

Demand for 328,559 apartments was recorded in 2016 across the country’s 100 largest metros, up 24 percent from 2015’s net move-in total. The 2016 demand figure was the third largest calendar year volume posted during the past three decades, just behind the demand realized in 2000 and again in 2010.

A slew of new properties moving through initial lease-up fueled unusually strong demand for 50,455 units in the fourth quarter, a period when renters tend to be hesitant to move due to the holidays and sometimes challenging weather conditions. Demand in the fourth quarter of 2016 reached more than six times the volume recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015.

Demand in 2016 topped completions that totaled 289,704 apartments. As usual, however, demand in the fourth quarter didn’t keep pace with deliveries. Properties finished during the final three months of the year totaled 87,939 units. The late 2016 additions marked the biggest block of quarterly new supply seen since the mid-1980s.

Occupancy Remains Tight; Rent Growth Slows Mildly

Year-end 2016 apartment occupancy stood at 96.3 percent, up from 95.9 percent in late 2015. Following the normal seasonal pattern, occupancy cooled a bit on a quarterly basis, dipping from 96.5 percent as of September.

Almost all of today’s vacancies in most locales are found in the very expensive brand new completions moving through initial lease-up. It can be very tough to find available units in the middle-tier to lower-end price ranges.

Rent growth is continuing to cool from an annual pace that topped out over 5 percent in 2015, but the 3.8 percent typical price increase posted in 2016 is still well above the long-term historical norm. Over the course of the seven years of the current apartment market cycle, rents have increased a whopping 26.3 percent.

“Rent growth doesn’t have to reach best-ever readings to be strong,” Willett said. “Somewhat smaller price increases certainly were anticipated as the volume of new construction kicked into higher gear.”

While rents backed up 0.5% on a quarterly basis in late 2016, that move is a typical quarterly pattern.

“It’s unusual for rents to shift much during the seasonally slow leasing period,” according to Willett. “Other than in brand new properties renting for the first time, only a few leases are signed in the cold weather months.”

Monthly rents now average $1,248 nationally.

Quite a few of the country’s individual metro rent growth leaders have economies where recovery trailed the national norm and apartment construction hasn’t yet reached aggressive levels. Sacramento and Riverside-San Bernardino, holding down the first and second positions for rent growth, are key examples.

 

Leaders in Annual Rent Growth for New Residents

Calendar 2016

 

Rank

   

Metro

   

Rent Growth

1 Sacramento, CA 9.3%
2 Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 8.5%
3 Seattle, WA 7.8%
4 Phoenix, AZ 7.1%
5 Las Vegas, NV 6.8%
6 Fort Worth, TX 6.7%
7 Nashville, TN 6.5%
8 Los Angeles, CA 6.4%
9 Atlanta, GA 6.3%
10 Portland, OR 6.2%
11 Dallas, TX 6.0%
12 (tie) Providence, RI 5.8%
12 (tie) Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL 5.8%
14 Salt Lake City, UT 5.4%
15 (tie) Orange County, CA 5.3%
15 (tie) San Diego, CA 5.3%
 

Other markets on the rent growth leaderboard are spots where very robust economic growth is keeping the apartment sector performance strong in the face of big deliveries. Seattle and the North Texas metros of Dallas and Fort Worth illustrate that storyline. That rent growth of 6 percent to 7 percent in Dallas-Fort Worth is particularly striking, considering the area accounted for an outsized share of about 7 percent of the nation’s total apartment deliveries in 2016. There are now 49,955 apartments under construction in Dallas-Fort Worth, representing about 9 percent of building activity nationally. That’s the country’s biggest block of product on the way by a giant margin.

Rent cuts continue in a handful of the nation’s key apartment markets. Prices are down about 1 percent on an annual basis across New York (-1.4 percent), Houston (-1.3 percent), San Jose (-1.2 percent) and San Francisco (-0.8 percent).

“While increasing deliveries are creating a more competitive leasing environment for top-tier product in New York and the Bay Area, rent cuts, rather than just a slowdown in the growth pace, seem like an extreme move in many cases,” Willett said. “Bay Area owners and operators perhaps are beginning to realize that they’ve overreacted, as pricing looks like it’s nearing stabilization after more sizable cuts were common a few months ago.”

Deliveries Should Peak in 2017

Ongoing apartment construction in the nation’s 100 largest apartment markets totals 542,446 units, with 364,730 of those apartments found in properties scheduled for 2017 completion. Thus, new supply in the coming year could top 2016’s total by 26 percent. That big bump in deliveries points to more competitive leasing conditions, especially for top-tier properties in the urban core, where building is heavy by historical standards.

It is important to realize, however, that labor shortages and other factors consistently have held completions in this market cycle about 10 percent to 15 percent below the volumes scheduled initially. If that same pattern holds true moving ahead, 2017’s deliveries could line up almost exactly with the demand total posted over the past year, suggesting that concerns about market softening could be overblown.

RealPage’s base-case forecast calls for occupancy to slip about 70 basis points to a still-healthy level well above 95 percent and for annual rent growth to cool a bit further to about 3.2%.

ABOUT REALPAGE, INC.

RealPage is a leading global provider of software and data analytics to the real estate industry. Clients use our platform to improve operating performance and increase capital returns. Founded in 1998 and headquartered in Richardson, Texas, RealPage currently serves over 12,000 clients worldwide from offices in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information about the company, visit http://www.realpage.com.

RealPage® Reports Robust Apartment Demand and Occupancy, While the Rent Growth Pace Cools Mildly

RICHARDSON, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Near-record demand for rental apartments registered in 2016, according to rental housing technology and analytics firm RealPage, Inc. (NASDAQ: RP). In turn, occupancy remained tight, despite rising numbers of completions. The rent growth pace is slowing a little, but pricing power remains above the historical norm.

“The apartment sector’s winning streak has run seven full years so far,” RealPage chief economist Greg Willett said. “Job production continues at solid levels, encouraging new household formation. While apartment construction is substantial, significant building is justified by the very strong demand tallies.”

Demand for 328,559 apartments was recorded in 2016 across the country’s 100 largest metros, up 24 percent from 2015’s net move-in total. The 2016 demand figure was the third largest calendar year volume posted during the past three decades, just behind the demand realized in 2000 and again in 2010.

A slew of new properties moving through initial lease-up fueled unusually strong demand for 50,455 units in the fourth quarter, a period when renters tend to be hesitant to move due to the holidays and sometimes challenging weather conditions. Demand in the fourth quarter of 2016 reached more than six times the volume recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015.

Demand in 2016 topped completions that totaled 289,704 apartments. As usual, however, demand in the fourth quarter didn’t keep pace with deliveries. Properties finished during the final three months of the year totaled 87,939 units. The late 2016 additions marked the biggest block of quarterly new supply seen since the mid-1980s.

Occupancy Remains Tight; Rent Growth Slows Mildly

Year-end 2016 apartment occupancy stood at 96.3 percent, up from 95.9 percent in late 2015. Following the normal seasonal pattern, occupancy cooled a bit on a quarterly basis, dipping from 96.5 percent as of September.

Almost all of today’s vacancies in most locales are found in the very expensive brand new completions moving through initial lease-up. It can be very tough to find available units in the middle-tier to lower-end price ranges.

Rent growth is continuing to cool from an annual pace that topped out over 5 percent in 2015, but the 3.8 percent typical price increase posted in 2016 is still well above the long-term historical norm. Over the course of the seven years of the current apartment market cycle, rents have increased a whopping 26.3 percent.

“Rent growth doesn’t have to reach best-ever readings to be strong,” Willett said. “Somewhat smaller price increases certainly were anticipated as the volume of new construction kicked into higher gear.”

While rents backed up 0.5% on a quarterly basis in late 2016, that move is a typical quarterly pattern.

“It’s unusual for rents to shift much during the seasonally slow leasing period,” according to Willett. “Other than in brand new properties renting for the first time, only a few leases are signed in the cold weather months.”

Monthly rents now average $1,248 nationally.

Quite a few of the country’s individual metro rent growth leaders have economies where recovery trailed the national norm and apartment construction hasn’t yet reached aggressive levels. Sacramento and Riverside-San Bernardino, holding down the first and second positions for rent growth, are key examples.

 

Leaders in Annual Rent Growth for New Residents

Calendar 2016

 

Rank

   

Metro

   

Rent Growth

1 Sacramento, CA 9.3%
2 Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 8.5%
3 Seattle, WA 7.8%
4 Phoenix, AZ 7.1%
5 Las Vegas, NV 6.8%
6 Fort Worth, TX 6.7%
7 Nashville, TN 6.5%
8 Los Angeles, CA 6.4%
9 Atlanta, GA 6.3%
10 Portland, OR 6.2%
11 Dallas, TX 6.0%
12 (tie) Providence, RI 5.8%
12 (tie) Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL 5.8%
14 Salt Lake City, UT 5.4%
15 (tie) Orange County, CA 5.3%
15 (tie) San Diego, CA 5.3%
 

Other markets on the rent growth leaderboard are spots where very robust economic growth is keeping the apartment sector performance strong in the face of big deliveries. Seattle and the North Texas metros of Dallas and Fort Worth illustrate that storyline. That rent growth of 6 percent to 7 percent in Dallas-Fort Worth is particularly striking, considering the area accounted for an outsized share of about 7 percent of the nation’s total apartment deliveries in 2016. There are now 49,955 apartments under construction in Dallas-Fort Worth, representing about 9 percent of building activity nationally. That’s the country’s biggest block of product on the way by a giant margin.

Rent cuts continue in a handful of the nation’s key apartment markets. Prices are down about 1 percent on an annual basis across New York (-1.4 percent), Houston (-1.3 percent), San Jose (-1.2 percent) and San Francisco (-0.8 percent).

“While increasing deliveries are creating a more competitive leasing environment for top-tier product in New York and the Bay Area, rent cuts, rather than just a slowdown in the growth pace, seem like an extreme move in many cases,” Willett said. “Bay Area owners and operators perhaps are beginning to realize that they’ve overreacted, as pricing looks like it’s nearing stabilization after more sizable cuts were common a few months ago.”

Deliveries Should Peak in 2017

Ongoing apartment construction in the nation’s 100 largest apartment markets totals 542,446 units, with 364,730 of those apartments found in properties scheduled for 2017 completion. Thus, new supply in the coming year could top 2016’s total by 26 percent. That big bump in deliveries points to more competitive leasing conditions, especially for top-tier properties in the urban core, where building is heavy by historical standards.

It is important to realize, however, that labor shortages and other factors consistently have held completions in this market cycle about 10 percent to 15 percent below the volumes scheduled initially. If that same pattern holds true moving ahead, 2017’s deliveries could line up almost exactly with the demand total posted over the past year, suggesting that concerns about market softening could be overblown.

RealPage’s base-case forecast calls for occupancy to slip about 70 basis points to a still-healthy level well above 95 percent and for annual rent growth to cool a bit further to about 3.2%.

ABOUT REALPAGE, INC.

RealPage is a leading global provider of software and data analytics to the real estate industry. Clients use our platform to improve operating performance and increase capital returns. Founded in 1998 and headquartered in Richardson, Texas, RealPage currently serves over 12,000 clients worldwide from offices in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information about the company, visit http://www.realpage.com.

RealPage® Reports Robust Apartment Demand and Occupancy, While the Rent Growth Pace Cools Mildly

RICHARDSON, Texas–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Near-record demand for rental apartments registered in 2016, according to rental housing technology and analytics firm RealPage, Inc. (NASDAQ: RP). In turn, occupancy remained tight, despite rising numbers of completions. The rent growth pace is slowing a little, but pricing power remains above the historical norm.

“The apartment sector’s winning streak has run seven full years so far,” RealPage chief economist Greg Willett said. “Job production continues at solid levels, encouraging new household formation. While apartment construction is substantial, significant building is justified by the very strong demand tallies.”

Demand for 328,559 apartments was recorded in 2016 across the country’s 100 largest metros, up 24 percent from 2015’s net move-in total. The 2016 demand figure was the third largest calendar year volume posted during the past three decades, just behind the demand realized in 2000 and again in 2010.

A slew of new properties moving through initial lease-up fueled unusually strong demand for 50,455 units in the fourth quarter, a period when renters tend to be hesitant to move due to the holidays and sometimes challenging weather conditions. Demand in the fourth quarter of 2016 reached more than six times the volume recorded in the fourth quarter of 2015.

Demand in 2016 topped completions that totaled 289,704 apartments. As usual, however, demand in the fourth quarter didn’t keep pace with deliveries. Properties finished during the final three months of the year totaled 87,939 units. The late 2016 additions marked the biggest block of quarterly new supply seen since the mid-1980s.

Occupancy Remains Tight; Rent Growth Slows Mildly

Year-end 2016 apartment occupancy stood at 96.3 percent, up from 95.9 percent in late 2015. Following the normal seasonal pattern, occupancy cooled a bit on a quarterly basis, dipping from 96.5 percent as of September.

Almost all of today’s vacancies in most locales are found in the very expensive brand new completions moving through initial lease-up. It can be very tough to find available units in the middle-tier to lower-end price ranges.

Rent growth is continuing to cool from an annual pace that topped out over 5 percent in 2015, but the 3.8 percent typical price increase posted in 2016 is still well above the long-term historical norm. Over the course of the seven years of the current apartment market cycle, rents have increased a whopping 26.3 percent.

“Rent growth doesn’t have to reach best-ever readings to be strong,” Willett said. “Somewhat smaller price increases certainly were anticipated as the volume of new construction kicked into higher gear.”

While rents backed up 0.5% on a quarterly basis in late 2016, that move is a typical quarterly pattern.

“It’s unusual for rents to shift much during the seasonally slow leasing period,” according to Willett. “Other than in brand new properties renting for the first time, only a few leases are signed in the cold weather months.”

Monthly rents now average $1,248 nationally.

Quite a few of the country’s individual metro rent growth leaders have economies where recovery trailed the national norm and apartment construction hasn’t yet reached aggressive levels. Sacramento and Riverside-San Bernardino, holding down the first and second positions for rent growth, are key examples.

 

Leaders in Annual Rent Growth for New Residents

Calendar 2016

 

Rank

   

Metro

   

Rent Growth

1 Sacramento, CA 9.3%
2 Riverside-San Bernardino, CA 8.5%
3 Seattle, WA 7.8%
4 Phoenix, AZ 7.1%
5 Las Vegas, NV 6.8%
6 Fort Worth, TX 6.7%
7 Nashville, TN 6.5%
8 Los Angeles, CA 6.4%
9 Atlanta, GA 6.3%
10 Portland, OR 6.2%
11 Dallas, TX 6.0%
12 (tie) Providence, RI 5.8%
12 (tie) Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL 5.8%
14 Salt Lake City, UT 5.4%
15 (tie) Orange County, CA 5.3%
15 (tie) San Diego, CA 5.3%
 

Other markets on the rent growth leaderboard are spots where very robust economic growth is keeping the apartment sector performance strong in the face of big deliveries. Seattle and the North Texas metros of Dallas and Fort Worth illustrate that storyline. That rent growth of 6 percent to 7 percent in Dallas-Fort Worth is particularly striking, considering the area accounted for an outsized share of about 7 percent of the nation’s total apartment deliveries in 2016. There are now 49,955 apartments under construction in Dallas-Fort Worth, representing about 9 percent of building activity nationally. That’s the country’s biggest block of product on the way by a giant margin.

Rent cuts continue in a handful of the nation’s key apartment markets. Prices are down about 1 percent on an annual basis across New York (-1.4 percent), Houston (-1.3 percent), San Jose (-1.2 percent) and San Francisco (-0.8 percent).

“While increasing deliveries are creating a more competitive leasing environment for top-tier product in New York and the Bay Area, rent cuts, rather than just a slowdown in the growth pace, seem like an extreme move in many cases,” Willett said. “Bay Area owners and operators perhaps are beginning to realize that they’ve overreacted, as pricing looks like it’s nearing stabilization after more sizable cuts were common a few months ago.”

Deliveries Should Peak in 2017

Ongoing apartment construction in the nation’s 100 largest apartment markets totals 542,446 units, with 364,730 of those apartments found in properties scheduled for 2017 completion. Thus, new supply in the coming year could top 2016’s total by 26 percent. That big bump in deliveries points to more competitive leasing conditions, especially for top-tier properties in the urban core, where building is heavy by historical standards.

It is important to realize, however, that labor shortages and other factors consistently have held completions in this market cycle about 10 percent to 15 percent below the volumes scheduled initially. If that same pattern holds true moving ahead, 2017’s deliveries could line up almost exactly with the demand total posted over the past year, suggesting that concerns about market softening could be overblown.

RealPage’s base-case forecast calls for occupancy to slip about 70 basis points to a still-healthy level well above 95 percent and for annual rent growth to cool a bit further to about 3.2%.

ABOUT REALPAGE, INC.

RealPage is a leading global provider of software and data analytics to the real estate industry. Clients use our platform to improve operating performance and increase capital returns. Founded in 1998 and headquartered in Richardson, Texas, RealPage currently serves over 12,000 clients worldwide from offices in North America, Europe and Asia. For more information about the company, visit http://www.realpage.com.

Marcus Hiles – Western Rim Properties Offer Exclusive Elegance to Sustainable Living

DALLAS, Jan. 3, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Innovative real estate developer Marcus Hiles, who singlehandedly altered the Texas real estate market with his creation of luxury apartments and townhomes, has maintained the highest standards for protecting the environment. With upscale rentals that are seamlessly integrated into the natural landscape, utilizing sustainably minded building practices and featuring state-of-the-art, energy-efficient amenities, Marcus Hiles’ Western Rim has made elegance eco-friendly.

In all of the communities built and managed by Marcus Hiles throughout Texas, residents enjoy resort-style living and upgraded conveniences. From the rich wood and Italian marble flooring to the cooling radiant barrier roofing in the attics of Western Rim’s Estates, Towers and Mansions brand properties, lavish interiors and green construction go hand in hand. The striking design of extra-tall, dual pane windows reduces heat loss in colder months by as much as 75 percent, minimizing cooling requirements during summer. Water-conserving irrigation systems feed opulent baths outfitted with jetted tubs and rainwater showerheads, while ENERGY STAR stainless steel Whirlpool® brand appliances provide stylish and sustainable choices for the refined gourmet chef-quality kitchens.

In addition to the environmentally minded details of the properties, Marcus Hiles ensures that green space within Western Rim’s developments stands as a top priority. Communities center on expansive urban and private parks, often providing on-site walking trails and dog run areas, while preserving existing trees and vegetation on and around the properties; As Hiles has continued to build upmarket homes in the Dallas, Austin, Houston and San Antonio suburbs, he has also increased the tree canopy beyond their pre-developed state—more than 3,000 trees were planted last year alone.

Marcus Hiles, Fort Worth property development authority and philanthropist, has spent more than three decades creating properties that embody his unique vision of luxury living for working class Texans. While growing his residential communities, Marcus Hiles has personally donated more than 59 acres of parkland to the general public to preserve wildlife habitats and offer residents accessible green spaces. He is deeply committed to education and has donated over $2.5 million to support children and universities.

Marcus Hiles – Chairman & CEO of Western Rim Property Services: http://www.MarcusHiles-News.com

Western Rim Property Services – Marcus Hiles – Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Western-Rim-Property-Services-Marcus-Hiles-1013270532051763/

Marcus Hiles (@marcus_hiles) – Twitter: https://twitter.com/marcus_hiles

Marcus Hiles – New Luxury Apartments in Frisco, TX – YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmsJNbfOh-g

SOURCE Marcus Hiles

Rose Bowl Rating Up Nearly 20%; Streaming Surpassed One Million Unique Viewers

  • Rose Bowl is Best Overnight and Most-Streamed Non-Semifinal New Year’s Six Game Ever; Philadelphia Sets Local Market Record
  • Sugar Bowl Overnight Up 15%, Streaming Up Nearly 80%
  • New Year’s Six Averages a 7.8 Overnight, Up Double Digits; Streaming Added Nearly 300,000 Viewers, Up 66% and Easily Most-Streamed New Year’s Six Ever

The Rose Bowl Game Presented by Northwestern Mutual between USC and Penn State (January 2 at 5 p.m. ET) generated an overnight rating of 9.4 on ESPN and streaming added an additional average minute audience of 300,000 viewers with 1,103,000 unique viewers watching a total of 75,989,000 minutes, making it by far the best overnight and most-streamed non-semifinal New Year’s Six game ever (12 games in three years).

Rose Bowl Generates Significant Growth in All Metrics From Last Year  
The overnight for the instant-classic was up 19% from last year’s Rose Bowl Game (Stanford vs. Iowa) which was played on its traditional January 1 date (5 p.m. on ESPN), while the streaming audience was up 68%, 64%, and 102%, respectively, in average minute audience, unique viewers and total minutes watched.

Additional Rose Bowl Highlights:

  • Last Two Minutes of Game Action Peaks Audience: The game peaked at a 12.4 overnight during the final two minutes of the fourth quarter, which included USC’s game-winning field goal (9:15 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.).
  • Philadelphia Sets Local Record: The City of Brotherly Love earned a 16.7 rating, the highest ever for a bowl game on ESPN (including championship games).
  • Los Angeles and Pittsburgh Draw Big Overnights:A. earned a 14.9 overnight and Pittsburgh a 17.0 overnight, the second-highest local market rating for a bowl game on ESPN for both cities (including championship games).
  • Top 10 Markets: Birmingham was the No. 1 rated market overall. The complete Top 10:
Rank Rating Market
1 19.2 Birmingham
2 17.0 Pittsburgh
3 16.7 Philadelphia
4 15.1 Columbus
5 14.9 Los Angeles
6 13.7 Tulsa
7 13.1 San Diego
8 12.8 Greenville
9 11.8 Portland
10 11.7 Fort Myers


Sugar Bowl Concludes New Year’s Six With Overnight Increase, Large Streaming Growth
The Allstate Sugar Bowl between Auburn and Oklahoma (8:30 p.m. on ESPN*) generated an overnight rating of 6.1 and streaming added an additional average minute audience of 198,000 viewers with 732,000 unique viewers watching a total of 43,733,000 minutes. The overnight for the Sooners’ victory was up 15% from last year’s Sugar Bowl (Oklahoma State vs. Ole Miss) which was played on January 1 (8:30 p.m. on ESPN) while the streaming audience was up 78%, 56%, and 89%, respectively, in average minute audience, unique viewers and total minutes watched.

Birmingham was the No. 1 local market, followed by Oklahoma City and Tulsa. Complete top 10:

Rank Rating Market
1 31.2 Birmingham
2 29.7 Oklahoma City
3 26.3 Tulsa
4 13.4 New Orleans
5 10.1 Austin
6 9.7 Nashville
7 9.5 Kansas City
8 9.3 Knoxville
9 9.1 Greenville
9.1 Columbus

The Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic between Western Michigan and Wisconsin averaged a 3.2 overnight and streaming added an additional average minute audience of 133,000 viewers with 434,000 unique viewers watching a total of 24,572,000 minutes. The streaming average minute audience was up 55% compared to the 2014 Cotton Bowl**.  The top 10 Cotton Bowl markets:

Rank Rating Market
1 18.0 Milwaukee
2 9.1 Detroit
3 6.4 Columbus
4 6.3 Birmingham
5 5.7 Minneapolis
6 5.1 Kansas City
7 4.9 Dayton
8 4.8 Tulsa
Atlanta
10 4.5 Richmond


New Year’s Six Up Double Digits; Easily Most-Streamed New Year’s Six Ever
ESPN’s presentation of the New Year’s Six*** generated an average overnight rating of 7.8 across the six games and streaming added an additional average minute audience of 293,000 viewers with 926,000 unique viewers watching a total of 63,487,000 minutes. The six game overnight average is up 10% from last season’s presentation of the same six games – including the College Football Playoff Semifinals being up double digits as previously documented —  and the streaming audience was up 66%, 30%, and 62%, respectively, in average minute audience, unique viewers and total minutes watched.  This year’s streaming audience is also up 194%, 104%, and 183% from the first year of the New Year’s Six (December 3, 2014 – January 1, 2015).  The TV overnights were down less than 5% from the record-setting inaugural year (8.2 overnight).

***New Year’s Six consists of Capital One Orange Bowl, Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl, PlayStation Fiesta Bowl, Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic, Rose Bowl Game Presented by Northwestern Mutual and Allstate Sugar Bowl. Each year, two of the games are College Football Playoff Semifinals.

Additional New Year’s Six Highlights:

  • Two of Top Three: ESPN aired two of the three highest-rated non-Semifinal New Year’s Six games this year – Rose Bowl and Capital One Orange Bowl (6.7 overnight).
  • Streaming Audience Continues to Grow: Led by the College Football Playoff Semifinals, this year’s New Year’s Six games account for three of the four most-streamed non-championship games ever for ESPN based on average minute audience. As previously mentioned, this was also easily the most-streamed New Year’s Six ever.
  • Top 10 markets: Birmingham, which was the No. 1 market in four of the New Year’s Six games, led the way as the No. 1 local market for the complete New Year’s Six. Complete top 10
Rank Rating Market
1 23.4 Birmingham
2 17.2 Columbus
3 13.7 Greenville
4 13.4 Knoxville
5 13.0 Tulsa
6 12.7 Dayton
7 12.1 Oklahoma City
8 12.0 Atlanta
9 11.8 Nashville
10 11.5 Cleveland

ESPN only

*Sugar Bowl began on ESPN2 and was joined in progress at the end of the Rose Bowl (approx. 9:30 p.m. ET); ESPN2 was not factored into the overnight

**2015 Cotton Bowl was a College Football Playoff Semifinal; 2014 Cotton Bowl was part of the New Year’s Six

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Media contact: Derek Volner at 860-384-9986; Derek.Volner@ESPN.com and @DerekVolner